Welcome to Masjid Aqsa-Salam

A Beacon of Community, Faith, & Service in Harlem

"And establish prayer and give Zakat, and whatever good you put forward for yourselves – you will find it with Allah." (Qur’an, 9:103)

Prayer Times

Jam'ah Times

Fajar

Zohar

Asar

04:15 AM

01:15 PM

06:00 PM

Maghrib

Isha

Jumaah

Sunset

09:00 PM

01:15 PM

Fajar

04:15 AM

Zohar

01:15 PM

Asar

06:00 PM

Maghrib

Sunset

Isha

9:00 PM

Jumaah

01:15 PM

About Aqsa-Salam

Imam Konate Sulaymane

The Masjid AQSA-SALAM is home to the oldest Muslim community ever founded in New York and its surroundings. It was established in 1996 by immigrants from Côte d'Ivoire. It is the result of the merger of two mosques of Harlem, AQSA and SALAM.

For nearly two decades, this Mosque represented a veritable symbol that brought together all the Muslim communities, the vast majority of whom are of West African origin. Indeed, beyond a place of worship, this mosque served as a hub, a true community center that played a very important role in the development of Harlem in general and the neighborhood commonly called 'Little Africa' (Little Africa).

Services & Activities

Five Times Daily Prayers

Quran and Islamic School

Funeral Assistance

Youth Activities

Day Care

Marriage Services

Family Counseling

Community Services Center

Support the Future of Our Masjid

Help Build Our Community's Home for Worship

As our community grows, so too does our need for a space that can accommodate the needs of our members, provide essential services, and serve as a center for spiritual growth and community engagement. We are pleased to inform you that our community has now completed the acquisition process of a new building!

Yes, we are now the owner of the 5 stories building located at 1629 Park Avenue, New York, NY 10029

This has been possible thanks to your support. Congratulations to you all and may Allah reward you!

By contributing to the renovation of our new masjid, you play a crucial role in shaping the future of our community and ensuring that future generations have a place to call home for worship, learning, and fellowship.

Thanks in advance for your support!

Let's join hands, to establish a lasting legacy for our children and many generations to come.

How Can You Support Us?

Donate easily by choosing one of the options below

Donate with Zelle

[email protected]

or

914-625-5724

Donate with Cashapp

[email protected]

or

646-270-6052

Check, cash or money order – Please make checks payable to ‘’MASJID AQSA’’

Donation Pickup

Call or Text Us

646-692-0447

Blog
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At Interfaith Luncheon, an Appeal for a Miracle

January 12, 20122 min read

Rabbi Marc Schneier greeted Imam Souleimane Konate at an interfaith Hannukah luncheon in Midtown.Credit Brian Harkin for The New York Times

Hanukkah is the Jewish holiday of miracles, commemorating how one day’s worth of oil left in a Jerusalem candelabra more than 2,000 years ago somehow lasted for eight days. Imam Souleimane Konate, the head of Masjid Aqsa, a mosque in Harlem, is hoping that bodes well for his cause.

The imam was one of eight Islamic leaders from the New York area to gather in a kosher restaurant in Midtown on Monday for a Hanukkah celebration lunch with Rabbi Yona Metzger, the Ashkenazi chief rabbi of Israel.

Rabbi Metzger, a tall man in a black fedora and long white beard, had just landed from Israel, so he swept in a bit late to the restaurant, Solo on Madison Avenue, with his wife and 13-year-old son.

“Salaam aleikum,” he said in Arabic to Imam Shamsi Ali, the head of the Jamaica Muslim Center in Queens. “Shalom aleichem,” Imam Ali replied, repeating the same greeting — Peace be with you — in Hebrew, a brother Semitic language.

8 Reasons

Rabbi Yona Metzer, left, Imam Shamsi Ali, center, and Rabbi Marc Schneier shared a table.Credit Brian Harkin for The New York Times

Rabbi Metzger, in his first meeting with Muslim leaders in New York, remarked that Jews and Muslims have more in common than Jews and Christians, as well as a more peaceful history of coexistence. “As the sons of Abraham,” he said, “we don’t need to use swords, we want to use candles, to use light.”

The event’s host, Rabbi Marc Schneier, who heads a group dedicated to Jewish-Muslim dialogue, the Foundation for Ethnic Understanding, pointed out that kind words were not enough to heal rifts between the faiths. “Miracles can happen, but people have to work extremely hard for them,” he said.

And to that end, Imam Konate brought up the problem that he has been grappling with.

His congregation is about to be evicted from its building on Frederick Douglass Boulevard because it can no longer afford its rent, which has gone to $10,000 from $4,000 in recent years as the boulevard has rebounded and gentrified. Now the rent is being raised to $18,000.

“The landlord is from the Jewish faith,” he told the rabbis. “We don’t even know what to do; what we are asking him to do is to give us time, so that we can search for another location.”

He asked if maybe the rabbis could intervene.

“So you’re asking for the chief rabbi and this rabbi to try to perform a miracle?” Rabbi Schneier asked, to laughter.

“We will try to help you,” Rabbi Metzger said, after asking how much time the imam needed to move. If the landlord was a religious man who attended synagogue, Rabbi Metzger added, he would be more likely to hear him out.

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Blog
blog image

At Interfaith Luncheon, an Appeal for a Miracle

January 12, 20122 min read

Rabbi Marc Schneier greeted Imam Souleimane Konate at an interfaith Hannukah luncheon in Midtown.Credit Brian Harkin for The New York Times

Hanukkah is the Jewish holiday of miracles, commemorating how one day’s worth of oil left in a Jerusalem candelabra more than 2,000 years ago somehow lasted for eight days. Imam Souleimane Konate, the head of Masjid Aqsa, a mosque in Harlem, is hoping that bodes well for his cause.

The imam was one of eight Islamic leaders from the New York area to gather in a kosher restaurant in Midtown on Monday for a Hanukkah celebration lunch with Rabbi Yona Metzger, the Ashkenazi chief rabbi of Israel.

Rabbi Metzger, a tall man in a black fedora and long white beard, had just landed from Israel, so he swept in a bit late to the restaurant, Solo on Madison Avenue, with his wife and 13-year-old son.

“Salaam aleikum,” he said in Arabic to Imam Shamsi Ali, the head of the Jamaica Muslim Center in Queens. “Shalom aleichem,” Imam Ali replied, repeating the same greeting — Peace be with you — in Hebrew, a brother Semitic language.

8 Reasons

Rabbi Yona Metzer, left, Imam Shamsi Ali, center, and Rabbi Marc Schneier shared a table.Credit Brian Harkin for The New York Times

Rabbi Metzger, in his first meeting with Muslim leaders in New York, remarked that Jews and Muslims have more in common than Jews and Christians, as well as a more peaceful history of coexistence. “As the sons of Abraham,” he said, “we don’t need to use swords, we want to use candles, to use light.”

The event’s host, Rabbi Marc Schneier, who heads a group dedicated to Jewish-Muslim dialogue, the Foundation for Ethnic Understanding, pointed out that kind words were not enough to heal rifts between the faiths. “Miracles can happen, but people have to work extremely hard for them,” he said.

And to that end, Imam Konate brought up the problem that he has been grappling with.

His congregation is about to be evicted from its building on Frederick Douglass Boulevard because it can no longer afford its rent, which has gone to $10,000 from $4,000 in recent years as the boulevard has rebounded and gentrified. Now the rent is being raised to $18,000.

“The landlord is from the Jewish faith,” he told the rabbis. “We don’t even know what to do; what we are asking him to do is to give us time, so that we can search for another location.”

He asked if maybe the rabbis could intervene.

“So you’re asking for the chief rabbi and this rabbi to try to perform a miracle?” Rabbi Schneier asked, to laughter.

“We will try to help you,” Rabbi Metzger said, after asking how much time the imam needed to move. If the landlord was a religious man who attended synagogue, Rabbi Metzger added, he would be more likely to hear him out.

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MASJID AQSA-SALAM is a 501(c)(3) non-profit religious organization dedicated to providing religious, educational and social services to the Muslim communities in New York.

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